With summer on our doorstep, Im sure we all have time to do some reading on the beach. There are answers to our problems other than governmnent and in the below reading list you shall find them. Enjoy!

Davey Crockett’s “Not Yours To Give” –  http://www.house.gov/paul/nytg.htm

James Bovard’s Liberty vs. Democracy – http://www.fee.org/pdf/the-freeman/July-Aug%2006%20Bovard.pdf  (spolier alert: liberty wins, LIBERTY WINS… take.. me out… to the… ballgaaaame….)
 

 

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
Economics in One Lesson by Henry Hazlitt
Human Action by Mises

Ron Paul’s Revolutioin a Manifesto

Conscience of a Conservative – B. Goldwater
History of Money and Banking by Rothbard

Democracy:  the god that failed    – Hoppe
Ethics of liberty    -Rothbard
Machinery of Freedom     -D Friedman

Tom Paine: Common Sense and The Crisis

Douglas Hyde: Dedication and Leadership

Faustino Ballve: Essentials of Economics

Andrew Bacevich: American Empire

Ron Paul: Foreign Policy of Freedom

Justin Raimondo: Reclaiming the American Right

Friedrich Hayek: Road to Serfdom

Rothbard: America’s Great Depression

Albert Nock: Our Enemy, the State

Chalmers Johnson: Blowback

Mises: Liberalism

Rothbard: Man, Economy and State

Hoppe: Democracy: The God that Failed

Michael Scheur: Imperial Hubris

Robert Pape: Dying to Win

Alan Greenspan: Age of Turbulence

 

 

 

 

  What Has Government Done to Our Money? by Dr. Murray N. Rothbard

This first one is still the best introduction to money I’ve come across, and with the situation constantly going on around us, I think it’ll be indispensable in the future.  Follow-ups to this work will be listed at the end.*  It’s quite a bit longer than most of the entries on this list.

 2.  “I, Pencil” by Leonard Read

     http://www.econlib.org/LIBRARY/Essays/rdPncl1.html (and many other URLs)

 Along with Rothbard’s money tract I tend to recommend this one to everyone.  This short essay is usually used as a beginner’s work.  Something meant to open people up to the concept of the invisible hand, and undirected, spontaneous order.  With this base one can continue on in a discussion about the possibilities of an undirected world.

 3.  “The Philosophy of Liberty” flash video presentation from ISIL.

     http://www.isil.org/resources/introduction.swf

 Something simple.  The video is based on a piece by Ken Schoolland (The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible).  Without getting into fine philosophical detail, this little video presents the libertarian message with concision and accuracy.  If people view this they can usually understand the way you think if not agree with you.  So long as they understand, there’s something to build on.

 4.  “patterns” a blog post by iceberg18 (a well written individual blog from a NYC Rothbardian)

    http://iceberg18.blogspot.com/2007/07/todays-mises.html

 I include this one as a launching pad for helping folks understand the case against so-called “intellectual property.”  Now, there are some libertarians out there who support forms of IP like copyrights, patents, and trademarks (e.g. Randians), but there are probably just as many who fight them as a form of government granted monopoly.

 5.  “Do We Ever Really Get Out of Anarchy?” by Dr. Alfred G. Cuzán

     http://uwf.edu/govt/facultyforums/OutofAnarcy.pdf

 6.  La Loi (known as The Law in English) by Claude Frederic Bastiat

     http://bastiat.org/en/the_law.html (and many other URLs)

 Works well for the minarchist, and for the anarchist.  Bastiat gives his theoretical defense for government that has no more powers than any individual.  Some might call that radical minarchism, or some might call that anarchism.  Though this work has been around for about 160 years now, it is relevant everyday.  This is probably the longest piece on the list of Reads.

 7.  L’etat (known as either The State in English, or The Government) by Claude Frederic Bastiat

     http://bastiat.org/en/government.html (and many other URLs)

 A quote should serve well, “Government is the great fiction through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else.”

 8.  “The Only Path to Tomorrow” by Ayn Rand

     http://fare.tunes.org/liberty/library/toptt.html

 This is a great little essay by a relatively young Rand.  She hadn’t given over to the Rightist/Conservative/Proto-Fascists just yet, and she voiced clear support for individualism against collectivism.  Not an unsullied anarchist piece, but very respectable nonetheless.

 9.  How Government Solved the Health Care Crisis by Roderick Long

     http://libertariannation.org/a/f12l3.html

 No list of mine would be complete without some contributions from Roderick Long.  This one is specifically on the Fascist medical system in America today, and how an older and better alternative was destroyed by the state.  This is also one of the pamphlets in William Gillis’ Market Anarchist series.

 10.  Punishment vs. Restitution: A Formulation by Roderick Long

      http://libertariannation.org/a/f12l2.html

 Necessary reading in my opinion.  Just what are the implications of the libertarian principle of non-aggression in regards to criminals and crime?  The piece includes a denouncement of punishment, and argues for a system of justice based on restitution as the only one compatible with libertarian principles.  This piece in combination with Rothbard’s “Punishment and Proportionality” can make one absolutely livid with rage when thinking about today’s “justice system” (more aptly systematized injustice).

 11.  A Four-Step Health-Care Solution by Hans-Hermann Hoppe

       http://www.mises.org/freemarket_detail.aspx?control=279

 A second healthcare/medical services entry.  This is one of my favorite short pieces by Hoppe.  Clearly written, easily understood, concise, to the point.

 12.  “Government Medical ‘Insurance'” by Dr. Murray N. Rothbard
      
http://www.mises.org/econsense/ch20.asp

 Continuing on a medical theme I include chapter 20 of Rothbard’s Making Economic Sense, in which he discusses the problems with modern medical insurance.

 13.  Gun Control and the War on Drugs” by Anthony Gregory

      http://www.fff.org/freedom/fd0502e.asp

 An excellent little write up by Anthony Gregory, highlighting the fact that not only do the two have shared origins, they are to the libertarian, different variations of the same tune.  Share this with those who support one and not the other to show them their inconsistency.

 15.  Inside the Martial Law Act of 2006″ by James Bovard

      http://www.counterpunch.org/bovard01092008.html

 Yet another update on where America is now, from the indispensable Jim Bovard.  With the erosion of Habeas Corpus protection, the near elimination of the Insurrection Act and the Posse Comitatus Act, the existence of near universal government spying, the legitimation of torture as a tactic, prison camps for enemies of the state, seizure laws reversing the presumption of innocence, a court dedicated to the presumption of constitutionality, and government intervention at every level and in every facet of Americans’ everyday life, the stage is already set for dictatorship, totalitarianism, tyranny, despotism, etc.  In fact, it might already be here in hiding.  Read some Bovard, get informed.

 

1.  Economics for Real People by Gene Callahan

     http://www.mises.org/books/econforrealpeople.pdf

 Specifically an introduction to Austrian econ, but he explains in such clarity regular economic concepts that this is a pretty good general work as well.

 2.  The Concise Guide To Economics by Jim Cox

     http://www.conciseguidetoeconomics.com/

 Lots of short entries on important topics of economics.  Great for just looking things up.

 3.  Capitalism: A Treatise on Economics by Dr. George Reisman

     http://www.capitalism.net/Capitalism/CAPITALISM_Internet.pdf

 George Reisman’s magnum opus.  It’s honestly too enormous to recommend that someone read through, so this is definitely a resource book.  A textbook even.  While Reisman is a statist he’s probably of the least offensive variety.  An inductee of the Randian cult through and through, you can hear Rand’s words come out of his mouth.  Even the title of the book is an ode to Rand (see the first sentence of Rand’s book Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal).

 4.  The Case for Free Trade and Open Immigration edited by R. Ebeling and J. Hornberger

     http://www.amatecon.com/etext/cftoi/cftoi.html

 More necessary reading in my opinion.  Unlike some other so-called libertarians and so-called anarchists Ebeling, Hornberger, the other authors whose essays are included in this collection, and all classical liberals have uphold the traditional libertarian position of open immigration (not managed and centrally planned immigration), and free trade (not managed and centrally planned trade).  This book is made up of essays by several authors, so one can pick and choose whichever sections one wants to read.  I even have chapters 6, 7, 18, 21, and 22 if anyone would like them (as they’re not included).  The Ebeling-Hornberger team also produced The Dangers of Socialized Medicine.  So if you like these essay collection books and the style that the editors edit with check that out as well.

 5.  Man, Economy, and State with Power and Market by Dr. Murray N. Rothbard
    
http://www.mises.org/rothbard/mes.asp

 Of course I was going to include Rothbard’s magnum opus.  Also designed as a college textbook, this is definitely in the resource section.  It’s gargantuan in size and scope.  Intended to supersede Mises’ Human Action as the authoritative Austrian/praxeological book (and Mises admitted that it had), it’s been the center of much of Austrian Economic studies since its publication.

 

 

 

 

When I tell people I believe in limiting the size and scope of government and individual freedom and abiding by the US Constitution, I often get “who cares…we NEED government..blah…blah…blah” This is from both conservatives and liberals alike.

Our founders who gave up so much in blood and treasure for our freedoms…that is political, social and economic would be very upset at what we have come to.  We seem to have lost the faith and confidence on how FREEDOM works. Trust in free markets and the goodness of philanthropy. Let people run thier lives and economy, not some elite few on a hill.

Below is a great letter from Bill St. Clair Crypto-Anarcho-Libertarian writer and activist, or perhaps from Larken Rose..there is some debate who wrote this.  Explains exactly what cohersion from government is and asks the question..Who Owns Me?

It never ceases to amaze me how people change what I say in order
to be able to rebut it. Some people “advocate” anarchy, meaning
they suggest doing away with government altogether, abolishing it,
and forming a free society. That is NOT what I am suggesting, any
more than I am suggesting that Santa Claus be abolished. I am
arguing about what IS, not what SHOULD be. The only “should” I’m
suggesting is that people “should” accept open their eyes to
reality, accept the truth, and throw away the insane, self-
contradictory, horribly destructive superstition upon which ALL of
the political beliefs of 99.9% of the population rest. I don’t want
to CHANGE reality; I merely want people to RECOGNIZE it, and then
deal with it as they see fit. When people tell me that they don’t
think my idea will “work,” or aren’t “practical” or “realistic,” it
tells me that those people aren’t reading what I wrote. About 90%
of political discussions I have with people amount to this:

Me: “Santa Claus isn’t real. He doesn’t exist.”

Other guy: “But Christmas would never work without Santa! We can’t
do away with him! You’re being too idealistic. The people would
never get Christmas to work without Santa! They’re just not
charitable enough. Sure, there should be limits on what Santa is
allowed to do, but we can’t have NO Santa. That would never work!
Your idea is too extreme. We need Santa to do SOME things!”

Let me break this down to something which is both amazingly simple,
and yet which hardly anyone ever thinks about (and which you will
NEVER hear discussed in any mainstream politic debate, or in any
“educational” institution):

Fred and Bob are hungry. There is one sandwich on the table in
front of them. They both want it. Who gets it? It depends upon who
“owns” it–who has a rightful claim to it? To whom does it belong?

The concept is pretty darn simple. Now try this: Who owns me? Do I
own myself, or does someone else (an individual or a group) own me?
At this point almost everyone responds by saying that I own me–but
almost NO ONE actually believes it.

What does it mean to own something? It mean to have the exclusive
right to use it as you see fit, to dispose of it if you wish, to
give it away, to sell it, whatever. For any given thing–including
me–SOMEONE has to have the “final say” on what is done with it. So
the question is, who has the ultimate say over what is done with
ME?

I do. And from that one simple statement, ALL of my political
beliefs can be inferred. Trouble is, most people never bother to
consider what all logically follows from that one simple statement.

There are four guys, including me, in a room. I want to play the
piano. They want to play doubles dominoes, which they can’t without
four people. Now, they have the right to try to talk me into
playing, or pay me, but when it comes right down to it, who has the
RIGHT to decide whether I play the piano or play dominoes? Me.

There are 22 guys, including me. I want to draw dinosaurs, and they
all want to play official-rules football (which requires 22
people). NOW who has the ultimate right to decide which I do? They
can beg, persuade, try a guilt-trip, bribe, bargain, etc., but in
the end, I AND I ALONE have the right to decide what is done with
me. Why? Because I own me, and they don’t.

If this seems so self-evident and so obvious that you’re wondering
why I would bother explaining it, that’s a good thing. Hold onto
your brains as we compare that painfully simple concept to the
authoritarian indoctrination we’ve all been exposed to.

If I own me, then I own what I produce. (The owner of the cow is
also the owner of the milk.) If I build a chair, with my own time
and effort, it belongs to me. And if I decide to trade my chair for
someone else’s basket of apples, then the apples become mine. They
belong to me, every bit as much as I belong to me. If I instead
trade my chair for a few silver coins, the silver belongs to me. No
one else. Me. I own me, so I own it.

Okay, I think I’ve about beaten that point to death, and at this
point hardly anyone would disagree–at least, they don’t THINK they
disagree. Do you think I own myself? If you say “yes,” try this
little test: If I want to spend all the silver I got from selling a
bunch of chairs, to buy a boat from someone else, do I have that
right? If I own me, I certainly do.

Oh, but wait. Some guys decided they get a cut of what I earn,
which they call a “tax,” in order to do stuff and buy stuff THEY
think is important. Is that okay? How about if it’s only a 1%
“tax”? Then is it okay?

If you answer “Yes,” you do NOT believe I own me; you believe that
“government,” or the collective, or my neighbors, or something else
owns me, but that I don’t own myself.

As with the sandwich, SOMEONE has the ultimate right to say what is
done with it. If anyone, or any group of people–whether wearing
the label of “authority” or not–has the RIGHT to take what I
earned–essentially, the right to take a piece of me–and I do not
have the right to overrule them, then THEY OWN ME. It’s no more
complicated than that.

Ownership is digital: either I own me, or someone else does. It
can’t be both. When there is a conflict of ideas about what should
be done with me, ONE side–the side which OWNS me–has the final
say. If we disagree, whoever has the moral RIGHT to enforce his
decision is the rightful OWNER of me. If you believe in “taxation”
at all, in any form and to any degree, you believe that someone
ELSE has the final say, which means THEY own me, and I don’t.

As you ponder that thought, don’t be tempted to rant about what we
“need,” or what “works,” or what is “practical” or “realistic.”
There are two options here, and ONLY two options: 1) I own me, or
2) someone else owns me. So which is it? Don’t tell me what you
think is “necessary” for civilization, or how society has to be
arranged, or whether my philosophy would “work.” Don’t bother
fishing for excuses for your answer, and don’t try muddling the
waters with rhetoric about “consent of the governed,” or “giving up
some of our rights,” or what will happen to society if people don’t
accept your answer, or any other evasions. (In other words, don’t
parrot the obfuscations and bunk that has been force-fed to all of
us in order to obscure and mangle what should be a painfully simple
concept.) Just tell me, WHO OWNS ME? (At the same time, you will be
answering another question: “Who owns YOU?”)

Pretty scary huh??? same goes for ones home..pay for it over 30 years, pay 10’s of thousands in interest to a bank, stand proud you pais off the mortgage…now do you OWN your home?  sorry, but NO. The government still owns the home as it owns you. Try not paying property taxes, the government will foreclose on you and take your paid off home. I can go on, but I dont want to you to faint, or better yet start a revolution…lol

with Ron Pauls ever growing popularity, some are getting to know Ron Paul for the first time. Even those that have supported him from the beginning may need a reminder of why he entered this race. above video is Ron Pauls speech announcing his intentions to run for President.

Ron Paul did not choose to enter this race to set agendas, gain power or even for  popularity.  He believes this country is not heading in the right direction, we have lost our way. this goes for the people and the government. if nothing is done now to change course and when rough times come, we the people must share the blame. if we continue to put our personal interest and materialism ahead of liberty, in the end we deserve neither.

i send this message to all to please get to know Congressman Paul a little better and begin to understand that big government, taxation, regulation, powerful central banks, managed trade agreements and corporate welfare are unsustainable.

I will end todays message with some warnings. the American way of life that we have been lead to believe is in reality a house of cards that is about to fall. those that study economics now realize that the credit markets that have been feeding our growth and lifestyle are about to crash. banks and hedge funds have been building wealth based on a assumption that there are $600 billion in SIV’s (off balance sheet assets). with a falling dollar, housing market crisis and certain interest rate increases the true value of these SIV’s could very well be less than $300 billion, probably less. These SIV’s are the base of this house of cards that is our lifestyle. once the market realizes their true value, thus making everything else on top (commercial paper, bonds, stocks..etc)  considered worthless. we will see a collapse of the financial system not seen since the great depression.

At this point there will be no winners. either the government along with the Fed bails out everyone with the largest transfer of wealth from the middle class to the rich(banks) or we let the markets take their course of correction. Either way, suffering and sacrifice will be thrown upon every American. We have lived way beyond our means for too long in a warfare-welfare state. The government has managed our lives, behaviors and economy into ruin. It is time to return to our constitutional beginnings.